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Cosmetic Write for usCosmetic write for us: According to the FDA, a cosmetic is a substance (other than pure soap) meant to be applied to the social body for washing, beautifying, boosting attractiveness, or altering the appearance. Cosmetics marketed for import into the United States must adhere to the same FDA laws and regulations as those made in the country.

What cosmetic requirements are checked throughout the importation process?

The FDA performs field investigations and collects cosmetic samples to ensure that the products and components are appropriate and safe for their intended usage (e.g., a colour additive in an eye shadow has been accepted for use around the eye).

The FDA will check the Color Identification Numbers if a cosmetic contains colour additives that require certification (CIN).

It will be confirmed if a cosmetic establishment has voluntarily registered and provided the registration number. See the links below for additional information about the optional cosmetic registration program.

Cosmetics were widely used in the Roman Empire when the Christian era began. As shown by the remains of objects likely used for eye makeup and the application of scented unguents, archaeologists believe the first cosmetics were employed in Egypt in the fourth millennium BC. To darken the eyelashes and eyebrows, as well as to contour the eyelids, kohl (a preparation based on lampblack or antimony) was employed. Various white powders were used to simulate or heighten the fairness of skin, and rouge was used to redden the cheeks. Different abrasives were utilized as dentifrices, and bath oils were commonly used. Natural resins were used as fixatives in the perfumes of the time, based on floral and herbal fragrances.

With the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, cosmetics, like other cultural refinements, vanished from much of Europe. It wasn’t until the Middle Ages that a renaissance occurred when crusaders returning from the Middle East brought cosmetics and perfumes back with them.

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